Red Sauce

November 19, 2015

Elevate Your Brand From a Sea of Sameness

MAKE YOUR BRAND PROMISE AN EMPLOYEE RALLYING POINT.

When a local school district unveiled its new brand promise, they asked employees to help bring more meaning to it. Principals and administrators led discussions with staff and together (with the help of branded “promise worksheets”) they crafted ways the district, their school or department and each person could help support the promise in new and important ways.



At Tacoma’s Franke Tobey Jones, an organization that rebranded nearly five years ago, the brand lives on when a team member's promise, which takes its cue from brand messaging, is broadcast to all staff. A recent example:




FIND CREATIVE WAYS TO HIGHLIGHT YOUR BRAND INSIDE AND OUTSIDE YOUR ORGANIZATION.

Brooks Running infuses its “Run Happy” tagline in everything from employee job applications to the national and international running events it sponsors. The company also weaves the meaning of this tagline into website copy and employee culture. No apply here button—potential employees are asked if they’re “ready to join the race?” and “run with the best!”

When Washington Women's Employment and Education changed its name to Courage360, the organization let its clients explain what's distinct about the brand.





CELEBRATE WHAT'S DISTINCT OR DIFFERENT.

Consider making a list of what your company does—and is meaningful to your target audience(s)—that’s distinct from your competitors. Sometimes a series of seemingly little things can help define and differentiate your brand. A few of our favorite differentiators:

  • Les Schwab Tires, still making minor tire repairs for free
  • Tacoma Public Schools, the state’s only innovative school district
  • Alaska Airlines, for tapping into Seahawk mania by offering early boarding privileges to passengers wearing the CFO’s (Chief Football Officer, Russell Wilson) jersey


Why a logo is not a brand

by an Art Director who shares a name with JayRay.

When I think about branding, I don’t just think about the logo. A logo or identity is designed, but a good brand is crafted and earned. Continue reading >>